Skip to main content

How video games changed the world

how video games changed the world
Charlie Brooker dominated Channel 4's Saturday night schedule where he looks at 25 of the most influential video games ever made. Video games still remain in a weird liminal zone between fan culture and mainstream understanding. By following Brooker theory, let's find more about how today the world is constantly changing face to the video game industry.  First, what we need to know is in the earlier '70s, video games were seen as a waste of time, do what happened to this industry? Why playing video games became so popular? Do you know some people like you and I are currently making a decent amount of money just by playing some video games? Awesome right? So let's dig in and find how an why the industry became more popular than the music and film industry combined together.

Victoria Szabo
Victoria Szabo, a visual studios professor and co-director of Duke’s Greater Than Games Lab, has been studying digital places and spaces and systems that take advantage of games, mobile devices, and other media to enrich history and culture. Victoria says that video games play a huge part of contemporary culture and society and according to her study, she says that the video game industry is just starting to appreciate the potential that video games have for creative and critical expression. So this is only the tips of the Iceberg. She also mentioned 4 reasons why video games have the potential to change the world. 

Gamer
Collaborative quests are a great way to practice for real-world group activities. Just think of World of Warcraft. That's the kind of game that tends to demonstrate this and it teaches people leadership skills. For example, the players in this game have to coordinate with diverse groups of people from around the world to come together and complete a task. It also involves recognizing and working with your strengths and playing collaboration and team games like Counter-Strike: Global Offensive and World of Warcraft are also a great way to build your leadership skills she said.

Video game industry
The second reason she invokes is a great discovery made by researchers that work on video games. Well in this case they have discovered that despite the potential to explore new identities, video games tend to prefer playing as themselves. This opens up a lot of space for online training programs but it also includes some work-group collaborations remotely. This is how so many serious gaming get involved in some activities like online therapy and conflict negotiation. There are lots of companies that now have online training programs. In other words, gamers became not only passionate about gaming but they became experts in those fields as well.

Video game consoles
The next reason is gamification using quests, badges, and other concepts. Victoria sais that those elements are a great way to introduce milestones and work on goal setting. She also mentions that all the games that will use these strategies are a great way to introduce task-based learning as well as work and skill development. When using those task and strategies in video games they tend to bring more fun into what might otherwise be conceived as boring work.

And finally, according to the study and like I said earlier, video games make more money than Hollywood entertainment when they release and there are often long pre-order schedules and players waiting to get their hands on the newest game. This shows that video gaming is a huge industry.

Anyway, there are probably more reasons why the gaming industry is so popular, especially in the last two decades with the introduction of mobile devices. I do believe that the people who are interested in this market should invest time, effort and money so they could make a living easiely. It's a matter of passion, where you can work and have some fun doing so.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Scott Pilgrim vs. The World: The Game - Complete Edition: A Reminder Of A Beat'em Up Classic

Scott Pilgrim vs. The World: The Game celebrated its 10th anniversary in the summer of 2020. And what better way to blow out your candles than to return to the ring in a “Complete Edition” intended for recent machines? This Beat'em Up published by Ubisoft and Universal Games was originally an adaptation of the Canadian comic book "Scott Pilgrim" by Bryan Lee O'Malley, a comic book also adapted into a film the same year and directed by Edgar Wright. But back to the main subject, has this classic 2D fight, which the shops have given up in 2014 for reasons that remain unclear, has it retained all its splendor? Note: The review of the "Complete Edition" of Scott Pilgrim vs. The World: The Game focuses on the technique, the content as well as the additions specific to this 2021 version. THE FIGHT COMES FOR US No need to go into detail on the qualities and the few flaws of the original game. Scott Pilgrim vs. The World: The Game was a generous 2D Beat'em U

Griftlands Review: From The Makers Of Don't Starve And Mark Of The Ninja Strike Hard!

In a few titles, Klei Entertainment has carved out a place for itself in the independent video game landscape. Don't Starve, Mark of the Ninja , Oxygen Not Included , Invisible, Inc .… All of these games enjoy a solid reputation and their existence is a testament to the versatility of a studio that can't standstill. After the infiltration, the tactical, the beat'em up and the survival game, the Canadian studio takes on the Deck Building genre. Still, in early access, Griftlands already has solid arguments to set itself apart from the big names and once again attest to Klei ’s mastery. IMPORTANT: About early access testing This Griftlands review assesses the strengths and weaknesses of Early Access and does not represent a definitive product review. This game review is valid for its date of 01/13/2020 and will need to be revised as the game evolves, before the test of the final version. STRONG FOUNDATIONS After Slay the Spire, a number of deck-building video games emerged

Unspottable Review: A very effective party-game where you have to hide in the crowd

In video games, we often complain about predictable AIs, which run around in plain sight and sometimes find themselves in the middle of the battlefield. But in Unspottable , this simplicity of mind is your greatest strength. The title is a multiplayer-only party game where you have to blend in with a crowd so as not to be flushed out by other players like Hidden in Plain Sight. The difference that the French of GrosChevaux deliver a less raw game, with a convincing realization, and above all, tons of ideas to make the games memorable. Before going any further, an important clarification: Unspottable is an exclusively multiplayer title (no single player mode) that offers games only locally on consoles, that is to say on Switch and Xbox One (release scheduled for January 21, 2021) and on PS4 (no release date yet). On PC, it is possible to work around this “problem” by using the Steam Remote Play or Parsec. Either way, the game can accommodate up to 4 players. According to the developers